Atheists, Agnostics and Humanists Find a Place in Interfaith Work

October 26, 2010

Note: Below is a very brief blog I produced while working at the Interfaith Youth Core / White House Interfaith Leadership Institute, which just ended today. Whew! So much to share about the last week; stay tuned. For now, my blog:

White House PictureAs a secular humanist working to advance positive and productive dialogue and action between the religious and nonreligious, I have been so thrilled to meet several nonreligious students at both sessions of the IFYC / White House Interfaith Leadership Institute.

One such individual is Michael Anderson, a young man in the cluster I am working with as an Alumni Coach. A Junior at McKendree University in Lebanon, IL, Michael has been doing interfaith for a long time, but his secular humanist identity was something that came a bit later. Though he experiences some tension as a humanist doing interfaith work, he also said, “I’m a firm believer that if things don’t sit well, that’s probably a good thing. I also believe that if you keep at it, that feeling might settle.”

Ultimately, he sees interfaith work as a pragmatic necessity. “We’re all just human beings, and we have to come to a conclusion on how to live together.”

Another nonreligious student at the Institute is Chelsea Link, a Junior at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA, who said that she does interfaith work because “there’s no way you can deny that religion is important in the world for so many people; the point of being a humanist is to find common ground in humanity, to support one another, to find meaning in life, and to work together. You can’t do that if you’re shutting out giant portions of humanity just because they believe different things than you do.”

Chelsea, who heard about the Institute through Harvard Humanist Chaplain Greg Epstein, said that she plans to carry everything she learned here out into the world to work to bring the religious and nonreligious together.

“When I found humanism, I felt like many humanists and atheists were detached from religious communities, and many were antagonistic toward the religious,” said Chelsea. “Meanwhile, at interfaith events, I didn’t see much of an invitation for atheists or humanists. The religious and nonreligious don’t know how to deal with each other; I’d like to see more reaching out from both sides. We shouldn’t be afraid of each other!”

After this weekend, I know there are many other amazing young leaders who agree with her.

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2 Responses to “Atheists, Agnostics and Humanists Find a Place in Interfaith Work”

  1. Kaleena said

    Do you have any contact info for Michael Anderson? I live in East St. Louis–only about 10 miles away from Lebanon…

  2. […] Chris Stedman (of NonProphet Status) and chatting with him for a few minutes. He interviewed me for a brief blog on the experience of atheist students at the Institute. Later, he expanded on this story for a […]

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