share your secular storyAs I mentioned last week, the new issue of Jettison Quarterly is out. But my article on the Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN)’s Takin’ It to the Streets is just the tip of the iceberg of Jettison‘s diverse content. And all the more, Jettison offered to publish the last of the amazing winning entries from our Share Your Secular Story contest in their latest issue! Joseph Blaha’s submission, “Learning to Love the Religious,” was selected by our panel of judges as the winner of the “Youth” category. Below is an excerpt of his entry; it can be read in full on pp. 46-47 of Jettison Quarterly:

Religion has always been a tricky subject for me. It always confused me that something so apparently influential could be considered almost taboo to bring up in general conversation. Because of this, other people’s theological beliefs used to rank pretty low on the long list of things I’ve spent my hours thinking about.

As I got older and began to build my own support community of other like-minded twentysomethings, I found that the people I’d become close enough with to approach the subject candidly tended to be just that; like-minded. This caused me to drift even further away from a common thread with the more dogmatic individuals I’ve encountered, making it easier to dismiss their motivations whenever our ideas seemed to clash. This misunderstanding of religious motivations more or less set my state of mind until I developed a deep enough relationship with a group of people who had religious beliefs. Continue reading at Jettison Quarterly.

jettisonMany thanks to the Jettison team for running this story. For more secular stories from our contest, check out Jeff Pollet’s submission that was featured in the Washington Post’s Faith Divide, Corinne Tobias’ entry on Killing the Buddha, Vandana Goel-LaClair’s submission on Killing The Buddha, runner-up Rory Fenton’s submission and Nate Mauger’s example story for NonProphet Status.

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streets

Photo by Leon Andrew Hensley.

Check out my article on the Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN)’s Takin’ It to the Streets in the Fall 2010 issue of Jettison Quarterly on pages 102-107. Below is an excerpt; it can be read in full at Jettison Quarterly:

It was one of the hottest days in a summer full of them, but even the blistering sun couldn’t compete with the hot rhymes blasting through Chicago’s Marquette Park.

Camped out beneath that scorching sun, the organizers of “Takin’ It To The Streets” weren’t deterred, greeting festival attendees with enthusiasm as they arrived.

Standing before an eager crowd of hip-hop lovers, one woman shouted: “Welcome everyone! How blessed are we to have this beautiful sun today?” The crowd responded with a cheer; I rubbed my already red arms, wishing I’d brought sunscreen.

Started in 1997, “Streets” is an annual summer festival organized by the Inner-City Muslim Action Network, or IMAN. Featuring a diverse lineup of musicians, artists, public speakers and vendors, “Streets… aims to bring the arts, spirituality, and a passion for justice together to unite diverse communities and inspire social change.”

Though “Streets” is a Muslim-led festival, its attendees were a diverse group – people of all races, religions and ages mingled in the International Bazaar, watched international graffiti artists collaborate on faith-inspired murals, listened to speeches by public figures such as U.S. House of Representatives member Keith Ellison, and applauded wildly when rappers Freeway and Brother Ali took to the stage for a surprise afternoon performance.

For Asad Jafri, one of those responsible for organizing the nation’s largest Muslim-led festival, the diverse mix couldn’t be more appropriate. Continue reading at Jettison Quarterly.

share your secular storyWhen we put out a call for stories just a few months ago, we received an influx of submissions from all across the United States and even across the globe, with entries from Ireland and Kenya and a story from one entrant’s childhood growing up in India. This great diversity of submissions made judging these and determining a batch of winners a difficult task for our esteemed panel of judges made up by the former Director of Amnesty International and 2000 “Humanist of the Year” Dr. William Schulz, the highly regarded author and academic Dr. Sharon Welch, the highest ranking Asian-American slam poet of all time Alvin Lau, the brilliant interfaith activist Mary Ellen Giess, the respected and poetic young West Coast writer Nick Mattos, and the renowned blogger, community activist and DJ Erik Roldan. But they rose to the occasion and the votes are in; we’re pleased to announce the winners of the Share Your Secular Story contest!

Interfaith

Winners: Jeff Pollet and Vandana Goel LaClair (tie)

Runner-Up: Rory Fenton

Moral Imagination

Winner: Corinne Tobias

Runners-Up: 1. Beatrice Marovich | 2. Jonathan S. Myerov

Youth

Winner: Joseph Blaha

Runners-Up: 1. Stephen D. Goeman, II | 2. Kyle Morgan

Congratulations to all of our honorees! You should be receiving your prizes (depending on the category, a signed book by Eboo syssPatel or Greg Epstein, a signed DVD by Fish Out of Water director Ky Dickens or signed CD by Ben Lundquist, per the contest description page) soon. And a special congratulations to our winners Jeff Pollet, Vandana Goel LaClair, Corinne Tobias and Joseph Blaha — your submissions will be eligible for publication in the Washington Post Faith Divide, Killing the Buddha, and Jettison Quarterly. More information on that to come.

Thank you to everyone who submitted to our contest for demonstrating that secular stories really do matter. Thank you to our panel of judges for donating your time and wisdom, and to our partners who donated prizes and publication space. But more than anything, I cannot wait for everyone to read what our honorees have produced.

Only five days remain to submit an entry to our Share Your Secular Story contest! Below, two exclusive statements from some of our collaborators:

jettisonEmanuel Aguilar

Marketing and PR Director, Jettison Quarterly

Jettison Quarterly is an arts and culture magazine who’s mission is to provide a platform for the further development and progress of contemporary culture in Chicago. Though we primarly focus on Visual Arts, Music, and Fashion, it is our overall interest to explore an interdisciplinary practice that encounters all fields. It is our belief that true progress can only come from being informed. This is why we are ecstatic to support and be involved with NonProphet Status’ Share Your Secular Story contest. Jettison is composed of a family with various religious, cultural and ethnic backgrounds and that is why we think it is important to not only support but also give a voice to all groups. Jettison is optimistic for the future, and the future is NOW.

Nick MattosNick Mattos

Writer / Share Your Secular Story Panel of Judges

On my garnering a degree in Religious Studies and my ongoing experience as a writer of religion, I began to see a great void in the literature – where were the examples of true personal narratives about Secular Humanism? There are plenty of anti-religious and counter-religious stories – one simply needs to look at the massive canon of “ex-cult” literature to see that there’s no shortage of one-time converts who are compelled to share their personal truths. However, what are not present in the discussion are religious narratives of the non-religious – secular stories.

Why is it important that secular stories get shared? Part of the real importance of religious narrative is to provide examples of what it means to live out spiritual or moral truths in the world. In this way, the stories serve a didactic purpose – they take abstract moral values and demonstrate them in a way that makes them real. Remember The Book of Virtues? Almost twenty years ago, conservative pundit-slash-former Secretary of Education-slash-Catholic activist William Bennett ripped off the title of the Tao Te Ching to provide a set of stories to orient the moral compass of a new generation. Why was it vastly influential? For all of the right-wing hamfistedness of the anthology, it insisted primarily upon showing and not telling – demonstrating what ethics and morals are, rather than detailing them.

syssWhat we’re looking to do with the Share Your Secular Story contest is not to create The Atheist’s Book of Virtues. We’re not even looking to make The Agnostic’s Book of Human Folly. What we are looking to do is to make the world split open. We are looking to give a growing presence in the landscape of spirituality – Secular Humanism – a place within our society’s narrative of virtues. The stories we’re looking for are stories that illustrate Secular Humanism’s heart, yes – but they’re also stories that give Humanism a body, hands to move in society, a face. We’re looking for stories of people exploring a world made meaningful, not by tradition or dogma or mysticism, but by the stark and elegant poignancy of just being human. We’re looking for you to share your secular story.

For Nick’s full guest post, click here. For more on the contest, click here. Don’t delay — the deadline is only five days away!

And now, some things going on in the world of NonProphet Status!

Jettison Quarterly at NEXT

jettisonThis past weekend I worked at the booth for Jettison Quarterly, the Chicago-based Arts and Culture magazine for which I am the Religion Staff Writer, at NEXT 2010: The Invitational Exhibition of Emerging Art, a part of Chicago’s Artopolis. The fair was a blast, as much for the excellent works on display as for the people I met. Writing for Jettison is great because it covers such a spectrum of subjects related to art and culture in Chicago that I am constantly interacting with folks from all different walks of life through my work with them. Jettison is also one of three publications that Share Your Secular Story contest winners will be eligible for publication in. Check out Jettison’s most recent issue for my profile of Ky Dickens, the director of documentary film Fish Out of Water. Oh, and speaking of…

Fish Out of Water DVD Release Party

foowLast week I attended the DVD release party for Fish Out of Water, the documentary film by Chicago filmmaker Ky Dickens. The release party was DJed by friends Mel Racho and Erik Roldan, who is also a co-founder of the Secular Humanist Alliance of Chicago (SHAC) with me and is a member of the panel of judges for the Share Your Secular Story contest. There was also entertainment by the hilarious Cameron Esposito and the energetic ensemble JC Brooks and the Uptown Sound, who put on an amazing show. The DVD release brought out an amazing community of people, which truly reflects the power of the film. Check out their website for more, and submit to the Share Your Secular Story contest by May 15 to be eligible to win a signed copy of the DVD!

Share Your Secular Story Contest Nearing Conclusion

syssIt’s come up a few times already in this post – our Share Your Secular Story contest – and it’s quickly coming to a close! The submission deadline is in 12 days; we’ve gotten some amazing submissions already but really want to make sure we’re getting the widest, most diverse set of secular stories. We hope that, if you haven’t already, you’ll consider submitting to the contest. All of the information you need can be found here; if you have any additional questions, don’t hesitate to contact us at nonprophetstatus@gmail.com.

Robocalls

robophonesFinally and most strangely: last week I received a series of bizarre, anonymous robocalls to my cell phone that were very sexually explicit and said that my “atheist blog” had made some god angry and demanded I take this blog down. The thing is, I can’t really say I’m sure they were sent by a religious person after listening to them, since the references to god were all explicit and offensive. At first I wondered if they weren’t from a friend trying to get my goat, but no one has come forward and I don’t think any of my prank-happy friends could hold out on accepting credit this long. The robocall company can’t access the information of who had them sent to me, so I’m at a loss. Either way, they stopped coming and my blogging continues. Whoever sent the calls — thanks for the puzzled laugh!

share your secular storyWe’ve been hinting that something exciting has been in the works for the past couple weeks; well, folks, the day is finally here.

We are so excited to announce the Share Your Secular Story contest, a call for stories by NonProphet Status!

We’re seeking previously unpublished personal stories written from a secular (Secular Humanist, Atheist, Agnostic, et al.) perspective. The stories of secular people are scattered because we as a people are scattered. Because there is little cohesion among us, our voice is often not loud enough to be heard in the modern religious marketplace. The secular stories that do get broadcast are most often volatile – secular people taking swipes at religious people – and reflect a divisive “us versus them” mentality. What gets told less often are the stories of people, secular and religious alike, living alongside one another peacefully and secular people expressing their own values within a diverse society. We want to hear more of these stories. We want to hear your story.

PRIZES: We are thrilled to offer a wealth of exciting prizes, including a ton of signed gear (DVDs, CDs, and books) from Harvard University Humanist Chaplain Greg Epstein, Interfaith Youth Core founder Eboo Patel, filmmaker Ky Dickens and musician Ben Lundquist. On top of that, a couple of the winning selections will be eligible for publication in the Washington Post’s “The Faith Divide” and Jettison Quarterly. Visit the contest page to hear more about our awesome giveaways!

PANEL OF JUDGES: We are also so very enthusiastic about our esteemed panel of judges featuring Dr. William Schulz, former director of Amnesty International USA and 2000 “Humanist of the Year,” academic Dr. Sharon Welch, superstar slam poet Alvin Lau, Interfaith Youth Core’s Mary Ellen Giess, writer Nick Mattos and DJ Erik Roldan. Check out the contest page to learn more about this all-star line up!

You can access the full details of the contest here. Click here to download a PDF of contest details; you can download it as a Word Document here. The submission period opens in one week on March 1, 2010. Spread the word, and don’t hesitate to contact us at nonprophetstatus@gmail.com with any questions you may have.

Stay tuned here, at our Facebook page, and to our twitter for more updates on the contest. We can’t wait to read your stories!

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