Note: Below is a very brief blog I produced while working at the Interfaith Youth Core / White House Interfaith Leadership Institute, which just ended today. Whew! So much to share about the last week; stay tuned. For now, my blog:

White House PictureAs a secular humanist working to advance positive and productive dialogue and action between the religious and nonreligious, I have been so thrilled to meet several nonreligious students at both sessions of the IFYC / White House Interfaith Leadership Institute.

One such individual is Michael Anderson, a young man in the cluster I am working with as an Alumni Coach. A Junior at McKendree University in Lebanon, IL, Michael has been doing interfaith for a long time, but his secular humanist identity was something that came a bit later. Though he experiences some tension as a humanist doing interfaith work, he also said, “I’m a firm believer that if things don’t sit well, that’s probably a good thing. I also believe that if you keep at it, that feeling might settle.”

Ultimately, he sees interfaith work as a pragmatic necessity. “We’re all just human beings, and we have to come to a conclusion on how to live together.”

Another nonreligious student at the Institute is Chelsea Link, a Junior at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA, who said that she does interfaith work because “there’s no way you can deny that religion is important in the world for so many people; the point of being a humanist is to find common ground in humanity, to support one another, to find meaning in life, and to work together. You can’t do that if you’re shutting out giant portions of humanity just because they believe different things than you do.”

Chelsea, who heard about the Institute through Harvard Humanist Chaplain Greg Epstein, said that she plans to carry everything she learned here out into the world to work to bring the religious and nonreligious together.

“When I found humanism, I felt like many humanists and atheists were detached from religious communities, and many were antagonistic toward the religious,” said Chelsea. “Meanwhile, at interfaith events, I didn’t see much of an invitation for atheists or humanists. The religious and nonreligious don’t know how to deal with each other; I’d like to see more reaching out from both sides. We shouldn’t be afraid of each other!”

After this weekend, I know there are many other amazing young leaders who agree with her.

Advertisements

tikkundailyPlease check out my new post over at Tikkun Daily on the new initiative I’m heading up for the Journal of Inter-Religious Dialogue (JIRD), in partnership with the Council for a Parliament of the World’s Religions. The project, called State of Formation, will be a forum for emerging religious and ethical leaders to engage the pressing issues of our time. The deadline for nominations is October 15th, so if you are or know an emerging ethical or religious leader, please don’t hesitate to fill out the nomination form here.

Below is an excerpt of the piece (which was also republished by JIRD’s InterViews here and My Out Spirit here); it can be read in full at Tikkun Daily:

“What qualifies you to do this?” I asked myself as I rode the train home one day to write my first contribution to the Washington Post’s On Faith last year. I listened to the wheels rumble beneath me, looked at those sitting around me, and knew I was headed in a new direction.

I was 22-years-old, an atheist, and a seminary student. Though I don’t believe in God, I decided to go to seminary because I wanted to find a way to bridge the divide between religious and secular communities. The summer after my first year at seminary I began interning at the Interfaith Youth Core, an organization that aims to mobilize a movement of young people positively engaging religious pluralism. The organization’s founder, Eboo Patel, maintained a blog for On Faith and invited me to submit a guest post for it.

At the time, I was beginning to recognize that the organized atheist movement often talked about religion in ways that created more division instead of less. As an atheist, I was frustrated by what I saw as a total lack of interest from my fellow atheists in respectfully engaging religious identities. So I sat down and wrote about it.

As I was working on my essay, I began to browse the rest of the site. On Faith features a panel of contributors that are among the most respected and knowledgeable experts in the fields of religion and ethics. But I didn’t see many blogs on their site by people who weren’t already established as authorities. I wondered if I was actually qualified to write for the website.

After my submission was posted, I started getting some unexpected feedback. “This is exactly what I think, but I didn’t know anyone else agreed with me,” wrote one reader. “Thank you for saying something our community really needs to hear,” wrote another. These readers happened to be young people.

bullhornI hadn’t thought that there were others who felt the same way I did, let alone other young people. I talked to a friend who maintained a blog of his own, and he suggested I create a blog to continue sorting through this issue.

I started NonProphet Status, and suddenly became a part of a larger conversation on the issue of religion and atheism. The blog quickly began to get traction in interfaith and atheist circles, and soon I was being asked to speak at conferences, received invitations to write in other venues, and watched my blog views grow from week to week. I, a young seminary student with a small but growing vision for respectful engagement across lines of secular and religious identity, suddenly had a platform.

Emerging leaders in formation, especially young ones, deserve to have a voice. In a time defined by deep political and religious divisions, we need to hear from those who will shape our ethical future. The current American discourse on religion and ethics is primarily defined by established leaders – ministers, rabbis, academics and journalists. While their perspectives are invaluable, this leaves an entire population of important stakeholders without a platform: the up-and-comers. Continue reading at Tikkun Daily.

ifycHey folks! Just wanted to fill you in on an exciting opportunity for anyone currently living in Chicago or looking to spend the upcoming summer here. I recently spoke with Amber Hacker, who coordinates the internship program at the Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), a Chicago-based organization working to empower young leaders to change the public narrative on religion from one of conflict to one of cooperation for which I lead workshops and interfaith trainings. Here’s what she told me:

“We are in the final phase of selecting for our summer internship class. We don’t have any Secular/Non-religious/Humanist/Agnostic/Atheist representation in our applicant pool, and I’d love to change that. We are committed to having a diverse class of interns in the fullest sense and we feel this representation is very important.”

As a graduate of IFYC’s internship program, I can say with confidence that this is a profound opportunity for all young secularists. I can personally attest to its benefits; my internship and continued work as an adjunct trainer for IFYC have given me the skills to facilitate dialogue and organize interfaith projects. But the gravity of having secularists involved in interfaith work transcends personal leadership development: I’m of the mind that it is essential that non-religious folks get involved in interfaith work for the overall good of the movement. As secularists, our perspective is valuable and necessary, and at IFYC it is valued and secular interfaith leadership is cultivated. I cannot underscore enough how important I believe this work is — if you are a secular undergraduate, I urge you to consider applying. Don’t let our community go unrepresented.

Here’s some more information on this opportunity:

IFYC’s Summer Internship Program is a leadership intensive with undergraduates from across the country committed to interfaith work on their campus. Interns will study the theory and history behind the interfaith youth movement while engaging in service learning and skill-building workshops as they gain valuable hands-on job experience. Interns will have the opportunity to work on various projects from curriculum design to fundraising techniques as they work in one of IFYC’s departments. They will receive training, do meaningful work as a valued staff member, receive mentorship, and build powerful relationships with their exceptional fellow interns.

You can visit their website to apply and get more information. The application deadline has been extended to March 31 to accommodate late applications.

%d bloggers like this: